Nothing Here Is Past | Pop-Up | June 2-4 by Tasha Ostrander

Last week, braveART experienced an interesting synchronistic moment between artist Maryellen Stewart, the philosophies behind her work and Mother Nature, herself. 

After a meeting with Maryellen and her husband Lee, talking of art and gardening, feeling the sun upon our backs and frolicking with the sixth of their adopted dogs of odd shapes and abnormalities, the Stewart’s generously gave us gifts from their garden of copious iris and tomatoes. We felt almost guilty cutting blossoms opening in their most glorious moment of living. Nature was harmonious and sensuous. We all felt a relief with spring and kindness in the air.

Maryellen had a new painting up on the easel that dealt with a combination of vertical and horizontal energies. A landscape on the bottom third of the painting shows time in the long term geological sense, rain and light are the vertical energies, shifting on a momentary basis. To see permanence and impermanence, in the same frame, as the constant in our lives, shows everything relative and in motion.  

By the time we were back at the office and had our flowers in a vase, an email came through from Maryellen informing us that a harsh hail storm had rolled in so unexpectedly that she and Lee were unable to cover any of the flowers or tomato plants, thus all the irises were shredded, Nature had shifted, our flowers were even more special. Such transition in the weather had illustrated so much of what Maryellen talks about in relationship with her work. Her paintings, abstracted portraits of time and weather, condensed, passing observations of light and strata that a painter sees and keeps, the observation and the conditions that will never be the same, and thus the artist saves the moment of shift and balance. 

VIEW MARYELLENSTEWART.COM
 

Pop-up | MARYELLEN STEWART
WHEN | JUNE 2-4 | 2017
WHERE | freeform art space | 1619 Ce de Baca Lane | santa fe (map)

OPENING RECEPTION | FRIDAY | JUNE | 2 5-8pm
HOURS | SATURDAY | JUNE 3 | 1-5pm | SUNDAY | JUNE 4 | 1-4pm

Nothing Here is Past, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 48 in.

Nothing Here is Past, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 48 in.

PROJECTbraveART | BELLE CARPENTER | POP-UP! @ Bodhi Bazaar | May 12 by Tasha Ostrander

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 9, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 9, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

 BODHI BAZAAR | DeVargas Center 564 North Guadalupe | Santa Fe (map)
 

Rinalda and Arabella was developed in 2012 as the canopy name for a project that has been in the making for decades. In the beginning, artist Belle Carpenter spent years painting wall frescos with French pastels and gold leaf to create images which are abstract in nature, reminiscent of Klimt, or the cave paintings of Lascaux. Carpenter works in layer upon layer of a dream like landscape, textured with intuitive markings, and occasional references to trees, fish, horses and figures, emerging for the viewer, adept at reading spirits, lingering just long enough for others to perceive.

In 2011 these frescos were photographed by Tasha Ostrander. By the poetic direction of Carpenter, Ostrander then reinterpreted these images through a fractal process of liquid computer software to create a landscape of flowers, psychedelia, and geometrical botanics. At this point there are over 70 pieces developed from the original frescos. A selection of the images have beenprinted with the light jet process. This medium has extraordinary vibrance, clarity and color.

In 2013 Belle Carpenter and Asif Shaikh entered into a collaborative project to interpret some of Rinalda & Arabella’s images onto elaborately hand embroidered tapestries and wearable art.

Asif Shaikh (from Ahmedabad, India) is a designer and master embroiderer with a passion for preserving the craft and reviving the art of embroidery…………… 

(Among many achievements of note,) In 2008, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London asked Asif to revive some of their Mughal embroidery pieces. Asif specializes in the 18th century aari embroidery that was produced by the royal courts. - Reviving a Dying Art-And Empowering Woman in the Process by Salma Hasan Ali, The Islamic Monthly

“It’s our duty to revive our ancient art and to pass it on to the next generation,” he says. So much has already been created in textiles and embroidery in the past 2,000 years in India that even if nothing new is created, it’s vital to preserve this rich heritage, he explains.

His goal, however, is not just to preserve but also to advance the art of embroidery and propel it to another level of craftsmanship and beauty. In the past two decades, he has revamped tools and techniques, developed new stitches and introduced miniature styles, blended traditional and contemporary designs and colors, supported and trained local artisans, and promoted education and appreciation for the art nationally and internationally.  - Christa Obuchowski of the AromaBotanica Institute

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 5, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 5, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 33, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

Belle Carpenter, Pavillion No. 33, 45 x 30 in., Lightjet print mounted to acrylic

Notes of an Artist.. | MARYELLEN STEWART POP-UP | JUNE 2-4 by Tasha Ostrander

As the days get closer to an artist’s exhibition there are always a range of emotions and challenges that arise if an artist is honest with herself…

From the journal of Maryellen Stewart…

Frequently I find myself in a conflict between the idea and the process, where the idea becomes secondary to the process or vice versa.  If a piece is successful it is because the idea and the process become synergistic, and therein lies the struggle.  In my most recent effort, I have been trying to present the unseen in nature, but how does one address things unseen?  Temperature, wind, the tides, even the plates of continents are powerful forces that we are not able to actually see; we see the results but not the cause..   As an idea these present but unseen forces are challenging my creativity and understanding of painting.  Idea and process, a dance over the abyss?

—Maryellen Stewart

Cirrus, 2017, Oil/acrylic on panel, 24 x 24 in.

Cirrus, 2017, Oil/acrylic on panel, 24 x 24 in.

Night Wind, 2017, Oil on canvas on panel, 36 x 40 in.

Night Wind, 2017, Oil on canvas on panel, 36 x 40 in.

Fall Wind, 2017, Oil/acrylic on panel, 28 x 36 in.

Fall Wind, 2017, Oil/acrylic on panel, 28 x 36 in.


Pop-up | MARYELLEN STEWART
WHEN | JUNE 2-4 | 2017
WHERE | freeform art space | 1619 Ce de Baca Lane | santa fe (map)

OPENING RECEPTION | FRIDAY | JUNE 2 | 5-8pm
HOURS | SATURDAY | JUNE 3 | 1-5pm | SUNDAY | JUNE 4 | 1-4pm


PROJECT braveART | MARYELLEN STEWART POP-UP! | June 2017 by Tasha Ostrander

Terra Firma 5, 2013, oil on canvas, 22 x 22 in. 

Terra Firma 5, 2013, oil on canvas, 22 x 22 in. 

VIEW MARYELLENSTEWART.COM

PROJECT braveART is pleased to present the work of Maryellen Stewart…

Maryellen Stewart was born in Nevada, grew up on ranches, and has always lived in the West. She earned a BA in English from Brigham Young University, a BA in art and a Masters in art education from Western Washington University, and an MFA from Claremont Graduate School. Her work includes painting, printmaking and sculpture, and her inspiration is the land.

Maryellen is currently working on a series of monotypes and paintings for her upcoming Pop-up to open on the first weekend of June at the freeform art space in Santa Fe.


Pop-up | MARYELLEN STEWART
WHEN | JUNE 2-4, 2017
WHERE | freeform art space | 1619 Ce de Baca Lane | santa fe (map)

OPENING RECEPTION | FRIDAY | JUNE 2 5-8pm
HOURS | SATURDAY | JUNE 3 | 1-5pm | SUNDAY | JUNE 4 | 1-4pm


In her work, Maryellen Stewart, shows the evidence of a lifetime’s meditation on the landscape of the West as a place of spiritual renewal. Her work employs certain strategies of formalism and repetition to contemplate geographical stratifications, weather patterns, and the shifting relationships between light, elements and air. Her vision in this long-term contemplation of the topography has taken Stewart’s art style into several directions. In certain bodies the land, sky and water are like Koan poems in terms of her ability to paint a visceral plane with reductive iterations that are fully complete abstract vistas. In other bodies, the landscape is further abstracted into bands of layered color and texture. These bands are not the sterile stripes of minimalism but painted stripes of a landscapist. Upon closer look these stripes are heavily worked and reworked.

Says Stewart, “It has been said that artists essentially make the same work over and over. I think this is true. In my work there is repetition of the rectangle, horizon line, diagonal marks or forms.  Also layering, which honestly comes from trying something, rejecting something, redoing something and rejecting it again and again.  Eventually this can provide depth and texture.  The poet, T. S. Eliot wrote, ‘. . .And the end of all our exploring/ will be to arrive where we started/ And know the place for the first time. . . “ I love this idea.  Finding renewal and inspiration again and again in the familiar. It is the situation where every work seems like a new experience to the artist.”

Stewart is a landscapist, crossing various territories from the hills of Milton Avery, to the flat and undulating plains of a painterly Sean Scully stripe, aware and interested in geographical layers of earth and activity whirling through the air itself. “The land, the natural world is not just beauty or serenity to me.  It is tumultuous, dangerous, living, changing, powerful, intense, wild, essential.  I struggle to communicate that.  Some wise person said, “Being an artist is possibly being a neophyte for the rest of your life.”  But Kandinsky wrote, “To slip and climb at once is not wonder. . .

Two Hills Waiting 2011, oil on panel, 24 x 24 in.

Two Hills Waiting 2011, oil on panel, 24 x 24 in.

Slow Winter 2016, oil on panel, 36 x 36 in.

Slow Winter 2016, oil on panel, 36 x 36 in.

Wind Series 3 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 261/2 in.

Wind Series 3 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 261/2 in.