Kathleen Morris | The Core of Being by Tasha Ostrander

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Oil paint has been the consistent medium in my paintings, as it tends to be very visceral and a lot about the paint. Most recently, I have included wax and asphalt. My work starts out in an abstract manner and ends up almost always figurative, although I don't work from models. It is important for my process to be able to change and move through time and space, as the painting dictates. The paintings represent a deep resolve of mine to pare back to the core of being; to get lost in it, to share it, to not care where I am going with it, and to give myself over to the bigger than me of it. In painting one is able to explore, the medium is malleable, the history of thought and the battle that goes into the work is sometimes visible on the surface. For me, it’s like a journey, every single painting.

-Kathleen Morris, 2017

Umbilicus, 2017, oil on canvas, 84 x 64 in.

Umbilicus, 2017, oil on canvas, 84 x 64 in.

The Disappearance, 2017, oil and gold foil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

The Disappearance, 2017, oil and gold foil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Nina Simone at Sea, 2017, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 in.

Nina Simone at Sea, 2017, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 in.

"Morris’s faces often epitomize the rubric that eyes are the 'window of the soul'. If you stand and look at these figures, you are included as a participant in the drama. The persona of this work taps into the nature of meeting and leaving; into the implications of witnessing, whether willing or not; into the ambiguity, awkwardness and messiness of always operating with no clear path". -Malin-Wilson Powell, Albuquerque Journal, 2011

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2107

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2107

Frank Ettenberg | Honoring All of It by Tasha Ostrander

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Of his most recent painting, Aqua Experience, Frank Ettenberg gives us some insight into his thought process.
 

...“This really continues something I’ve been doing for quite some time, and has lots to do with writing and sequences of forms.…like you can take it back to [Eadweard] Muybridge, I know that I’m getting more and more interested in time sequences of forms. And that implies lots of interest in motion or the effect of motion, and I also think, well - the camera freezes motion, and what do you get when it’s moving?.. it’s blurred. But the point is, I accept the fact that things will get blurred and things will stay focused.

...And in real life you never really know when things are going to be the most optimal, so you have to work with all of it, so in a sense, I’m working with all of it in my work, like mistakes, as intension. I honor all of it because I’ve always been one for spontaneity and something unexpected . And so the unexpected is a big part of the impact of my work. Whether people know that, or not, is another question. But I do believe that when you say the work is fresh it has something to do with the unexpected."

 

Aqua Experience, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 66 x 48 in.

Aqua Experience, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 66 x 48 in.

Greetings From Down Here, 2001-2002, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 40 in.

Greetings From Down Here, 2001-2002, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 40 in.

Gotten By, 1999-2011, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 36 in.

Gotten By, 1999-2011, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 36 in.

Introducing Watercolorist: James Doyle by Tasha Ostrander

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

 

Dr. James Doyle (b. 1959) is an American watercolorist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  He is a painter, musician and author with a PhD. in International studies.  For more than 25 years he has worked on global security issues related to nuclear weapons for the U.S. Department of Energy, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and as a private consultant. His many writings on these subjects can be found in Newsweek, the Wall street Journal, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and the National Interest.

James challenges himself to paint water media in a deep, vibrant key while seeking beauty, balance and craftsmanship.  His influences include Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Andrew Wyeth, Edward Hopper, Charles Burchfield, Milford Zornes, Georgia O’Keefe and Arthur Haddock.  Natural forms, water, skyscapes, the personality of animals and imaginary landscapes are some of the subjects Doyle explores.  He began painting avidly in 2003 and is dedicated to a full life of learning and expression through watercolor. 

Serengeti, 2017, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 30 x 22 in.

Serengeti, 2017, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 30 x 22 in.

Untitled, 2017, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 30 x 22 in.

Untitled, 2017, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 30 x 22 in.

Untitled, 2017, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 30 x 22 in.

A Serious Painter | Marc Ouellette by Tasha Ostrander

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

Photo: Tasha Ostrander©2017

 

A Serious Painter, Marc Ouellette

When one first encounters a painting or group of paintings by Marc Ouellette, it is impossible to ignore his bold approach to both color and composition, the instinctual correctness of form, weight and line. Primarily, Ouellette is a figurative painter, though the figures he chooses as subjects are not restricted to the human animal, nor even to the animal world.

The humble farm animals have a glorious presence. Each fairly quivers with vitality. How?: a draftman’s attention to animate muscle and sinew, hide, beak, and plumage, the choice to fill the canvas so that the sole subject–the donkey, the rooster, the sow–bursts the rectilinear bounds. These lives emerge from dark, obscure backgrounds and hold us in thrall to their mute dignity.

The other, more personally significant (we may assume from his Artist Statement) grouping of Ouellette’s work are the corpulent human figures. These subjects are almost always placed in minimalized, merely suggestive public settings–the beach, poolside, the park; a subway car or airport lounge. The settings, whether natural or artificial, are awash in cold, glinting light (and that light is the other subject in these paintings). Generally, the figures are scantilly clothed, often wearing swimsuits, or sloppily dressed in leisurewear. They are exposed in moments of mundane activity like drinking, yawning, texting, staring off into space. These paintings could be understood as anonymous portraits of appetite, loneliness, lassitude, melancholia, self-indulgence, indifference, or any combination thereof. Flesh here appears neither rosie, nor luxurious, nor erotic. It is not jolly flesh (these are not jolly characters); it is heaviness, and it is starkly real, recognizable to most viewers. However, it would be a mistake to assume the subjects of these paintings are intended as objects of disdain or derision. Ouellette paints beautifully what might be deemed ugly, with a determination to convey truth.

These are serious paintings; there is a commitment to both the expert application of paint to canvas and to the conveyance of ideas. The beauty is in the seriousness. 

 

Upcoming Event!

MARC OUELLETTE | PORTRAITS

Asheville, North Carolina
September 8 - September 30 | 2017
821 Riverside Drive #179
Asheville, NC 28801 United States

Goose, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in.

Goose, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in.

Pig, 2013, oil on linen, 28 x 36 in.

Pig, 2013, oil on linen, 28 x 36 in.

Swingset, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 50 in.

Swingset, 2017, oil on canvas, 40 x 50 in.

Shrines To Darwin Augustus Perth | Walter W Nelson by Tasha Ostrander

 

In 1999, Walter Nelson's great companion of fifteen and a half years, a red healer, Darwin Augustus Perth, passed away. In life together, they had ventured to many  spiritual places the land had to offer. Darwin had traveled at Walter's pace for fifteen years, Walter traveled at Darwin's for the remaining six months. In memory of their brotherly bond, Nelson set out to build two land shrines in the deserts of New Mexico and Texas. Walking with only a ball of hemp twine, and Darwin's ashes, nature gave Nelson the rest of the objects to create an incredible homage to his beloved friend. The endeavor expanded to eighteen land shrines spreading out to the reaches of Europe.

Upon the completion of "Shrines To Darwin Augustus Perth", Nelson wrote, "Our spirits have merged together into the magical realms of eternity that all life can enter with the proper awareness." 

                                                           

REMEMBERANCE

As a pup he would run across fields of small cactus as Jesus walked across water.  He had no fear.  He would descend the deepest canyon and follow for miles our horses across the desert. 

He would ascend a rough mountain, cautiously choosing his path, to gaze upon a majestic horizon, contemplating, sensing his origins from the past; for his origins flowed from the beginning of time-a desert dog, dreamtime, walkabout, a song line.

His eyes were intense as burning coal as he looked into your soul.

He was the color of apricots, blending with white earthen sand.

He loved the water, chasing lapping waves against a rocky shore.  He rejoiced to the voice of the raven, the sound of the wind, the presence of nature, which were all part of his being.

He was a buddy, a loving friend.  When times were hard, he was always there, always giving from within his gentle love.  With an affectionate nudge or lick he would share his simple wisdom that all would be well, that life and joy would prevail over loneliness and fear.

I am saddened his life came to an end, but the memories of out fourteen years together will always dance in my mind like magical fireflies in late evening’s golden light.

His spirit will always be there, on the paths we walked together, in the rocks, the canyons, the trees, drifting in the desert winds and wandering the distant blue mountains.  He is free as the wind now, he has become part of the earth and sky, and he roams the majestic beauty of the great unknown, that mysterious place where we will all be someday.  Our lives will intertwine again in that unknown future, my spirit entering his world, as he once entered mine.

I love you – my heart says so.

July 1 st, 1999 – 5:15AM

WALTER W. NELSON

The Black place, near Nageezi, New Mexico

The Black place, near Nageezi, New Mexico

To the Arno River, Florence, Italy

To the Arno River, Florence, Italy

Shrine Valley, Base of Pedernal Mountain, New Mexico

Shrine Valley, Base of Pedernal Mountain, New Mexico

 

 

Bob Richardson| Interior Twist by Tasha Ostrander

Bob Richardson with Another Hot Day, oil on canvas, 59 x 49 in.  Photo©Tasha Ostrander 2017

Bob Richardson with Another Hot Day, oil on canvas, 59 x 49 in.  Photo©Tasha Ostrander 2017

To collect figurative art is to surround oneself with other counterparts, body types, postures, frozen time and attitudes.The figures stare out into the interiors of which they have been placed, they slouch, turn their heads in disinterest, flop on beds and stick their feet into the forth dimension, our homes. They are who they are. These representations of the human character, exhibit themselves as solid physicality and uncompromising moodiness. By example, do they allow us to relax a bit more? These portraits animate against solid angular furniture and walls and twist not only in spacial perspective but play with the architecture of our interior selves. They remind us of our humanity when others are not watching. They soak up a bit of the awkwardness so that we may be a little bit more relaxed about ourselves.

Cousin Pete, 2017, oil on canvas, 42 x 32 in.

Cousin Pete, 2017, oil on canvas, 42 x 32 in.

Three Days Later, 2016. oil on canvas, 60 x 40 in.

Three Days Later, 2016. oil on canvas, 60 x 40 in.

Another Hot Day, oil on canvas, 59 x 48 in.

Another Hot Day, oil on canvas, 59 x 48 in.

Pretty is a Dangerous Thing by Tasha Ostrander

 

 

Yari Ostovany ©Tasha Ostrander 2017

Yari Ostovany ©Tasha Ostrander 2017

This April, Tasha Ostrander of braveARTconsulting had the incredible pleasure of a studio visit with Yari Ostovany at his Bay Area studio. A discussion unfolded of various material and ethereal/mystical workings of creativity that go beyond pretty and into the realm of discovered beauty. Beauty is not always pretty but informs and sustains itself on a soul level as a teacher and a signifier of deeper levels of thought, feeling and aesthetics.

Yari Ostovany paints as if music, pigment and safflower oil all share the same viscosity. A baritone singer with the San Francisco Choral Society off and on for the last 25 years, he speaks of various qualities that music and abstract painting share.

Ostovany “Music has always been very important to me and I think of my work in some ways as musical compositions in paint, I am not translating music into a pictorial state at all, but going back to the original source where music comes from because a lot of the elements are the same; you deal with rhythm, loudness, softness, warm and cold colors… And I do believe in that saying, that all music is our most direct connection with the world beyond, I think it’s the most readily excepted form of art as abstract. It’s not questioned. You don't get what quite often painters get, What does this mean? What is this trying to show? With Music, it either takes you somewhere or it doesn’t. You never question what does this mean? What does this piano riff mean? Music, and just poetry in general, and again not just poetry but the poetic, of going back to the source where that energy comes from - the energy before it becomes poetry, the energy before it becomes music is what I try to connect with. Years ago I read something about Antonio Tapies whose work I’ve always admired, he said he didn't work from nature, he worked with nature. On a very fundamental level I work with the gravity of the earth, as I let the paint come down the canvas and I turn it and I let other layers go over those and move. This always amazes me, its an amazing source of energy that we take for granted.

Ostrander: I think to connect with the Source there is a constant back and forth between knowing and not knowing. A trust is required to dialog with the materials. It’s a constant fluctuation of creating, trusting, destroying that which is too comfortable to create something of interest. When I look at the way Gerhard Richter works there are points where he’s achieved a really gorgeous piece and then goes and wipes it all out and it becomes something else quickly, he’s so daring it’s almost painful to watch but the result is something of incredible beauty… at the cost of a few pretty paintings below the surface.

Ostovanyi:  PRETTY is the operative word here, Pretty is a very dangerous thing verses beauty because sometimes you arrive at something pretty that you could be quite happy with, and some collectors would be quite happy with as well, but something inside is gnawing at you that it is not beautiful, it’s pretty. And then that destroying and rebuilding, that’s also kind of a tricky thing because if you think of it as destroying, that takes you in a different direction but when you step back and look at the longer arc of it, that’s just another step in the evolution of the work. And I always say you can never ruin a painting if you dare to ruin it. If you don't have faith and you get to some place that feels somewhat comfortable, you just stay there, and that I find dangerous. And that’s what Richter is talking about. I actually learned that through Francis Bacon many years ago, if I’m not mistaken, he said that when you get stuck in a painting, it’s usually what you like most in it that’s keeping you, so you have to paint that out. That’s a very difficult thing to do at first because you’re very attached to it. But then you realize it’s not about having a beautiful area in a painting, it’s about having a painting that works as a whole.

And again, about music, I’m drawn to many different composers, foremost among them being Bach and Beethoven, and the way I work actually has to do more with Beethoven not with Mozart where everything was basically dictated from the above. What is special about Beethoven is that he took something very mundane, things that people might not even notice, and just kept working it and working it until he got a gem out of it. He didn't look for a gem, he built a gem, through trial and error, by “destroying and rebuilding”. I approach it the same way, whatever happens on the canvas, the next thing is usually a response to that, and then the next thing is a response to that. Then again, as I said earlier it stays at that level until another sense, a breath of life, is what I call it, comes into the piece. It’s really difficult to put your finger on it, and when and how that happens, but when it happens you know it, and then thats when you get rid of the pretty and enter the realm of the beautiful.

Ostrander: Alchemy seems to be the undercurrent of what Yari’s paintings all are about. From the diverse elements of creative structures passed down from old masters of music and abstractions, to the chemical reactions of materials interacting with one another, to the connection with nature’s source, ones own soul evolves, base becomes light, we fight mediocrity and strike for luminescence of our own knowing. The artist grows to know his incantations and we are left with the gems of beautiful paintings.

Yari Ostovany ©Tasha Ostrander 2017

Yari Ostovany ©Tasha Ostrander 2017

Chelleneshin No. 39, 2016, oil on canvas, 78 x 66 in.

Chelleneshin No. 39, 2016, oil on canvas, 78 x 66 in.

The Third Script, 2016, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

The Third Script, 2016, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

Chelleneshin No. 34, 2016, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

Chelleneshin No. 34, 2016, oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

BETTY GOLD | A Living National Treasure by Tasha Ostrander

Betty Gold in the Factory, Los Angeles circa 1979

Betty Gold in the Factory, Los Angeles circa 1979

VIEW BETTYGOLD.COM

braveART is honored to represent internationally renowned sculptor and painter, BETTY GOLD.

Gold can easily be considered a living national treasure in the arts. For decades she has broken new ground for the Modernist and MADI vision. At 82 years of age, she is still working with a veracity and energy few possess. braveART is honored to collaborate with such a distinguished tour de force of the art world.      

A full length feature film, A Year with Betty Gold, directed and produced by Professor J. McMerty of Elon University, is set to debut in Summer 2017.

Betty Gold, who opened her Santa Fe studio in 2010, is an established, internationally known professional artist who has shown in over one hundred thirty solo and group exhibitions in her career and who currently has work in more than seventy-five permanent collections around the world. bettygold.com

National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea; 1987 Kaikoo IX and XVII. 8.5' x 14' x 10' and 14' x 7.75' x 8.5'.

National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea; 1987
Kaikoo IX and XVII. 8.5' x 14' x 10' and 14' x 7.75' x 8.5'.

Fordham University, Bronx, New York; 1983. M.H. XV. 15' x 8' x 6'.

Fordham University, Bronx, New York; 1983. M.H. XV. 15' x 8' x 6'.

Gold turned the male-dominated sculpture world “on its head” by winning countless public arts commissions beginning in the early 1970’s. She became associated with MADI, an international abstract art movement, which she claims opened many doors for her. In 2005, Gold was honored with a major retrospective exhibition at the Casal Solleric Museum, a historic castle in Palma, Spain on the island of Mallorca. Exhibitions featuring the work of Columbian artist Fernando Botero and Mexican painter Frida Kahlo graced the same castle following Gold’s retrospective exhibition...

...Gold’s sculptures are placed both outdoors in year-round environments as well as interior environments.  Whether large scale or on a smaller scale, her sculptures have a timeless sensibility and a resounding impact.  Gold loves to create site-specific commissions for each client’s individual needs.  These commissioned sculptures range from four to twenty eight feet in height and are painted in various colors or sometimes remain unpainted for a more organic expression."SHINE" Artist Spotlight - Betty Gold

Betty Gold in Seoul South Korea circa 1985.

Betty Gold in Seoul South Korea circa 1985.

In Europe, where Gold's work probably is better known than at home, she is associated with a long-standing movement, named MADI, of artists who deal in bright geometric forms. In the last decade Gold has taken part in major MADI exhibitions in Madrid's Reina Sofía national art museum and in Bratislava, Slovakia, where one of her 10-foot sculptures stands in the garden of the presidential palace. By Ariel Swartley, Special to The Times

Gold’s sculptures continue to break the physical boundaries of geometry, as well as encompass a minimalist sensibility akin to Ellsworth Kelly and the playfulness of Joan Miro. Yet, she emerged a bona fide pioneer as a sculptor of Cor-Ten steel and, in a male-dominated field, produced a gutsy body of work that spans nearly four decades.- Steven Biller Betty Gold: The Mallorca Series

braveART Takes On! | KAY HARVEY by Tasha Ostrander

Kay Harvey in the studio | Santa Fe, NM | Photo ©Tasha Ostrander | IV RAW Series, 1998, oil on canvas, 72 x 108 in.

Kay Harvey in the studio | Santa Fe, NM | Photo ©Tasha Ostrander | IV RAW Series, 1998, oil on canvas, 72 x 108 in.

braveART is pleased to represent American painter-sculptor, Kay Harvey.

Harvey works in a language of abstraction based on materials and the artist’s vision which has reference to landscape and the human figure. Her process struggles with chaos and structure, through layering, gesture and making marks. "Her works on paper sometimes spills from the wall and intersects into 3-D space. Exploring structure and chaos, she is unafraid to cannibalize her own work, ripping up her monoprints or leaving ragged edges, splatter paint, and fragments". Tom Tavelli, director of 333 Montezuma Arts

In the coming weeks braveART will uncover and share Harvey's significant bodies of work over her 50 year career in landscape & abstract expressionist painting, sculpture, and monotypes & works on paper.

Between 1985 and 1994 Harvey intensively immersed herself in series of residencies at the Santa Fe Art Institute under the esteemed tutelages of Richard Diebenkorn, Larry Bell, Ken Tyler, Helen Frankenthaler, Lynda Benglis, and Richard & Garner Tullis. Later in the decade she concluded a residency at the International Studio Program in New York City.

“Though the definition is unclear,” artist Lynda Benglis has said of Harvey’s work, “the gesturing is very unified and is a much realized, ritual motion of what a painting or print can be said to be about: color, texture, light, and surface.”

Harvey's work is process oriented. She learns through "doing and through the accidents that happen when [she] takes chances". She explains, "I like the influence of surprise as it takes me out of the plans that I might have made. Often I set myself up with ideas that are removed from what actually happens in the act of painting. It is in the state of painting that I can not explain how it happened, cannot put words to it but it just is and that's wonderful".

Of Kay Harvey, American curator, John Mulvany writes, "..Harvey is working outside the cultural spotlight. Absent in her work is a heavy breathing, big star ambition for a masterpiece. Kay maneuvers through her ideas and materials seeking the psychological edges., the boundaries that make and become the conditions for the next piece. Over an extended period of time Kay's art has been committed to this inward driven nature of painting. For the past few decades she has turned her efforts to investigate abstraction. Hers is a quest, a continuation of the tradition examining painting as an end in itself, an activity able to create and sustain an aesthetic experience by means of the artists vision and energy with only paint, paper, and canvas free of any reliance on reproducing the observed world, or re-representing an already lived experience. Kay's art is unambiguously dedicated to the proportions of art as having a freestanding value beyond any other context". Catalog from Capriccio 1985-2010, Works by Kay Harvey, curated by John Mulvany, An Exhibition at 222 Shelby Street Gallery and 333 Montezuma Annex, Santa Fe, NM April 8 - May 7, 2011.

La Tierra XVIII, 1987, oil on canvas, 50 x 42 in.

La Tierra XVIII, 1987, oil on canvas, 50 x 42 in.

Yellow/Blue (framed) diptych, 2009, Monotype , 42 1/2 × 60 1/2 in.

Yellow/Blue (framed) diptych, 2009, Monotype , 42 1/2 × 60 1/2 in.

RAW Series VI, 1998, oil on canvas, 72 x 108 in.

RAW Series VI, 1998, oil on canvas, 72 x 108 in.

braveART Takes On! | BOB RICHARDSON by Tasha Ostrander & Ben Lincoln

Bob Richardson in his studio | Santa Fe | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2017

Bob Richardson in his studio | Santa Fe | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2017

braveART is pleased to represent the work of Bob Richardson

Bob Richardson, an American figurative artist, born 1946, raised in New Jersey, found home in Santa Fe New Mexico where he’s lived since the late sixties. . 

Richardson is a self taught artist. He acknowledges that school was a place he ran from. His formal art education includes the Art Student’s League during high school, several studio classes at Bard College and much later classes with local Santa Fe artists. Those opportunities provided Richardson a window to what could be possible. 

Initially an abstract painter, the more time spent at the easel, the more commonality he felt with figurative artists. Slowly transitioning, leaving an element of abstraction in his work, his paintings reflect his insights into people and his ability to place those visions on to canvas. “When I paint", he has said, "I work to capture an unrehearsed moment of someone’s life … a snap shot in time frozen with no context”.

Richardson emerges back in to the public eye having honed four decades with his work. He paints his subjects with rawness and authenticity - stripped, intentionally, of any pretense or feigned beauty. However, that is not to say the he conceptually rejects beauty. For Richardson, beauty emerges within his subjects who submit themselves to the canvas...awkward and bare. What seems rejected are the notions of class, righteousness, or privilege. Richardson is an every-man visual artist who demystifies the every-man's (woman's, human's) claim to an entitled lineage.

Like the literary artist more than a generation before Richardson, in an introductory essay, author Adam Zagajewski observed of Rainier Maria Rilke, "a diffident, homeless poet born on the periphery of the Habsburg Empire, an artist who had to invent his own pedigree...a lover of solitude, someone who, especially in his later years, didn't care much for publishing and remained until the end of...his life famous among only a small group of connoisseurs". The Poetry of Rilke, author Edward Snow, Introduction by Adam Zagajewski, North Point Press © 2009

Gosh...I'm beautiful 2017, Oil on canvas, 54 x 54 in.

Gosh...I'm beautiful 2017, Oil on canvas, 54 x 54 in.

Cousin Pete 2017, Oil on canvas, 42 x 32 in.

Cousin Pete 2017, Oil on canvas, 42 x 32 in.

Woman on Red Chair 2016, Oil on canvas, 50 x 42 in.

Woman on Red Chair 2016, Oil on canvas, 50 x 42 in.

NATALIE BIESER | Arroyo Moods by Tasha Ostrander

Braided Bed, 2017, watercolor on Italian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

Braided Bed, 2017, watercolor on Italian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

Following the success of her pop-up in December, Natalie Bieser returns with a new body of work, Arroyo Moods. Bieser achieves, simultaneously, a precision and fluidity of a biomorphic landscape. Stroke and movement sculpt dry river beds - Arroyos. From a seemingly still and monochromatic earth, Bieser perceives color, shape and time - revealing the impact of water, rain and flood that transform desert-carved passages in these dynamic new works.

In her own words, Bieser writes...

In an ongoing appreciation of the ubiquitous, the common, the endemic, or the mundane in nature, I find myself attracted to what are known as washes, gullies and here in New Mexico the arroyo.

As the landscape spreads ahead of me it speaks. I channel it as I move down the trail, a lot of the snow has melted back leaving a puffy and delicate crust under my feet and my prints are the first since the last snow. I’m headed down toward a nearby, no-name arroyo, it attracts me like a magnet. It pulls me toward it as if I were a drop of collected summer rain, streaming into the waiting bed. Today the arroyo’s mood is serene and benign, there is a crisp and clean look about its surface. Ripples and other irregularities in the bed rise clearly in the cold air and bright sunlight, the mood is inviting. 

I’ve been in this same arroyo under very different moods. Sometimes quiet but expectant, as distant thunder booms in a leaden sky, will the rain flow this way? When? Better stay out. Another mood, one of rage, due to a violent summer monsoon, the muddy rainwater rushing by… carrying with it whatever it can, from empty plastic water bottles to bits of leaf and wood and I’m sure small insects and at times other wildlife. 

These moods can flip so quickly; the rushing water passing with 20 minutes at times and leaving changed characteristics in its wake, always waiting to be changed again.These variable moods are the basis for my new group of watercolors of the common arroyo.

– Natalie Bieser

All the rage, 2017, watercolor on Italian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

All the rage, 2017, watercolor on Italian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

Laying in wait, 2017, watercolor onItalian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

Laying in wait, 2017, watercolor onItalian watercolor paper, 41 x 29.5 in.

braveART Takes On! | FRANCISCO BENITEZ by Tasha Ostrander

Francisco Benitez in the Studio, Santa Fe 

Francisco Benitez in the Studio, Santa Fe 

braveART is pleased to take on: Francisco Benitez. Benitez (b. 1967) was raised in New Mexico, New York, and Spain. His mother, flamenco dancer and choreographer, María Benítez, and his father, a Spanish set designer, Cecilio Benítez, influenced his subsequent interest in tenebrist painting and baroque art. Benítez studied Classics at St. John’s College (Santa Fe), and then academic painting techniques and anatomy/figure drawing at the Art Student’s League in New York City. Benítez subsequently obtained his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of New Mexico, during which time he studied abroad at the Facultad de Bellas Artes in Granada, Spain, through an exchange program, and later did graduate-level independent study.

Of his own work, Benitez writes....

Oftentimes, when people see my work for the first time, they might be fooled into thinking I’m a very traditional artist who is somewhat retrograde and wants to return to the past. I am anything but. Although I have always had a deep regard and attraction to the art of the past, I have wanted to connect it to today’s systems of thought and political psychosocial realities.

What began as a metaphorical archaeological dig into the techniques, methods, and iconographies of the past, has morphed into a conceptual project whereby I become a sort of chameleon, continually adapting my style(s) to deconstruct the historical trappings of said styles, in order to lay bare certain realities which led to their initial creation and implementation.

My recent project, Doña Inés Lost Her Slipper”, describes the relationship between a Spanish aristocrat landed in the New World, and her Indigenous maidservant. In that multi-media project I expanded my repertoire beyond traditional oil painting to mixed media techniques, installation, and video. With the paintings in particular, I juxtaposed power images of the aristocrat, executed in the techniques of the 18th century, with highly expressionistic, Modernist images of the maidservant, therefore highlighting the West’s fascination with Primitivism and the colonial power images which were witnesses to Primitivism’s development in the first place. The project also explored the relationship of the two women to each other, and their place as women in a highly patriarchal, colonial culture whose vestiges remain very clear today in our post-industrial cultural landscape.

My featured blog piece, “Two Doña Inés in an Industrial Landscape”, is a large drawing representing my main character, Doña Inés, twice in a sparse industrial landscape. I drew the initial inspiration from Frida Kahlo’s famous work where she depicts herself twice, connected by a blood vessel. In this piece, Doña Inés has her eyes and mouth covered as she faces the viewer. She is uncomfortable in her role as an aristocrat, as she embodies a social class which in her century, would lead to the mass industrialization and ecological crisis of our century. Although at the top of her social order, she is trapped by the cumbersome and confining dress she wears. Her personal identity fades into a silhouetted simulacrum for a reigning paradigm.

My ongoing work tends to focus on portraiture, especially of women with oblique references to phallocratic symbols such as smoke stacks and Greco-Roman columns. I am interested in painting my subjects as real people living today, but also as complicit collaborators or critics of the politics of art historical representation.

Je Survole le Monde, oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Je Survole le Monde, oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

La Contessa oil on canvas, 54 x 38 in.

La Contessa oil on canvas, 54 x 38 in.

Muse of Spheres, oil on panel, 24 x 36 in.

Muse of Spheres, oil on panel, 24 x 36 in.

New Work | WALTER W NELSON by Tasha Ostrander

Occotillo 2017, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

Occotillo 2017, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

braveART is pleased to present the newest work of Walter W Nelson. Nelson has immersed himself in the Big Bend area of Texas landscape and this new series continues the discovery of this majestic topography.

In his own words, Nelson writes...

Dalquest Research Site Paintings | 2017

In the summer of 2016 I revisited the Dalquest Research Site owned by Midwestern State University where I spent 2 years photographing this magical canyon producing a book in 2006“Ribbons Of Time” with text by Douglas J Preston.

The purpose of this revisit was to do a series of paintings inspired by the magic that resides in this canyon, a canyon that is matched only by the Grand Canyon. To date I have executed five paintings two of which are attached with this letter “Ocotillo w/ Flowers” and “Red Canyon”.

“Ocotillo w/ Flowers” was inspired by the magical dance of intertwining branches of this desert plant, in the spring, with their beautiful red flowers silhouette against a cerulean blue sky with expansive visions of space and landforms.

These inspirations come from a series of drawings executed while spending a period of six weeks in Marfa, Texas in 2016.

-Walter W. Nelson

The Wedge 2016, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

The Wedge 2016, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

The Angel of Repose 2016, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

The Angel of Repose 2016, oil on paper, 22 x 30 in.

CIEL BERGMAN | ALCOVES February 3, 2017 by Tasha Ostrander

PUBLIC RECEPTION | Friday | February 3, 2017 | 5:30P -7:30P
New Mexico Museum of Art
107 West Palace Avenue
Santa Fe, New Mexico

EXHIBITION RUNS | February 3 - March 26, 2017

Please join braveART in celebrating the late Ciel Bergman for Alcoves #7 at the New Mexico Museum of Art. Each year The Museum selects 35 artists - 5 new artists every seven weeks. While we continue to mourn Ms. Bergman's recent passing, we are pleased and honored for Bergman to have been selected next month among an esteemed group of artists including, Jessica Edgar, Ilona Pachler, Clayton Porter and Edie Tsong.

CONVERSATION WITH THE ARTISTS | March 3, 2017 | 5:30pm

Helios Series Untitled II 2014, oil on canvas, 66 x 108 in.

Helios Series Untitled II 2014, oil on canvas, 66 x 108 in.

Helios Series Untitled I 2015, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 in.

Helios Series Untitled I 2015, oil on canvas, 36 x 36 in.

For Sales and Inquiries please contact braveARTconsulting.

Ciel Bergman | 1938 - 2017 by Tasha Ostrander

Ciel Bergman 1938 - 2017 | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2016

Ciel Bergman 1938 - 2017 | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2016

This week the world lost a dear friend and human being  - Ciel Bergman. Ciel was a brilliant woman, intellectual, activist, feminist and environmentalist. 

She leaves behind a legacy in the art world - an awareness of the healing powers of beauty and creativity. For Ciel, beauty was the antidote to suffering and painting was a part of the drive of the human soul: to make marks.

Ciel made an indelible mark on all of us that knew and loved her. 

braveART was honored to know and work with such a generous, creative, and powerful artist. 
She will be deeply missed.

-Tasha & Ben

MARC OUELLETTE | Master Painter by Tasha Ostrander & Ben Lincoln

Tom, 2017 oil on canvas 40 x 40 in.

Tom, 2017 oil on canvas 40 x 40 in.

VIEW MARC OUELLETTE with braveART on ARTSY.net

braveART is pleased to present two, new master works by Marc Ouellette: Tom, a 40 x 40 in. oil on canvas painting is another in the Farm Animal Series; and Man Texting, a 60 x 52 in. oil on canvas is the latest in Ouellete's Fat Men Series.

In an Artist's Statement, Ouellette describes the inspiration and motivation in his work. Ever the master painter, he weaves raw cultural commentary with own unique version of magical realism. 

Artist's Statement: MARC OUELLETTE

At the core of my interest as a painter is the human condition as observed in American* contemporary life. I gravitate towards white men as subjects, primarily, because I am a white man; and secondly, I have for decades been troubled with questions of masculinity and over-consumption in our society. I paint people, in general, because ultimately my concern is with society as a whole. I also paint portraits of barnyard animals. Since childhood a part of me has had a romantic vision of life on a farm.  

Frequently, I search for my subjects at the beach. There I find humanity fascinating. Stripped of everyday clothing and accessories–the indicators of social status and occupation–my subjects are, by choice, casually and frankly revealed. What I paint begins with what I observe that draws my interest. This includes the excesses of American life, which may be reflected by overweight individuals, at leisure or on their phones. 

Generally the paintings contain a single subject, exposed and isolated in the nearly featureless landscape, in glinting sunlight. Mundane objects may be included for the sake of context or simply composition. One reason for a painting (as opposed to the original photographic image): the painting removes us as viewers a step further away from the experience and character of the individual and towards the universal. I don’t expect the viewer to recognize him/herself in my paintings, except in the broader sense of humanity. I intend my paintings to visually and emotionally engage the viewer and to perhaps raise questions about who we are and where we are going as Americans.

*United State of America

 

Man Texting, 2017 oil on canvas 60 x 52 in.

Man Texting, 2017 oil on canvas 60 x 52 in.

More from the Fat Men Series...

Independence Day, 2014 oil on canvas 40 x 50 in.

Independence Day, 2014 oil on canvas 40 x 50 in.

Happy, 2015 oil on canvas 40 x 38 in.

Happy, 2015 oil on canvas 40 x 38 in.

Introducing: YARI OSTOVANY | Into the Mysterious by Tasha Ostrander & Ben Lincoln

Yari Ostovany, Photo by Dariush Nehdaran©2016

Yari Ostovany, Photo by Dariush Nehdaran©2016

VIEW YARI OSTOVANY with braveART on ARTSY

 braveART is pleased to introduce Yari Ostovany.

Born in Iran in 1962, Yari Ostovany moved to the United States at the age of 16 and pursued his studies in Art first at the University of Nevada - Reno and then at the San Francisco Art Institute where he received an MFA in 1995. He was based in Cologne from 2000-2004, and since 2011 has returned to the San Francisco Bay Area where he lives and works.

 His work is in the permanent collections of institutions including the New Britain Museum of American Art in New Britain, Connecticut, Pasargad Bank Museum in Tehran, Iran, Permanent Collection of the University of Nevada - Reno Art Department as well as numerous private collections in the US, Europe and the Middle East and is represented by Gregory Mansfield Artist's Agency in Chicago and Art Represent in London, UK. In 2017 Ostavany will exhibit at Aria Gallery in Tehran, Iran.

 

The paintings of Ostovany take us into a reverie of the mystic.

The spiritual strips the apparent bare, humbling our sense of Being, to some greater force of nature’s resonance, of beauty which lies within the tension of tonal vibration of dissonance and harmony. It is the experience of true mindfulness when one is not oneself but is in the rush of the heavens that part, we drink the essence, brought to us out of the chorus of time and tone, history and practice.

Yari Ostovany has embraced poetry, musical composition, meditation, philosophies of the East, and the West, as elements, much like the alchemists, to distill a sense of spirit and awakened consciousness through the medium of paint. His paintings render a transformation of materials left by the explorations of things mysterious, metaphorically sought after through the creative act, to engage the spirit.

 “I am interested in the crossing point of the unconscious, the personal and the collective, and energies that come to surface from the interplay of primordial contradictory forces—those within and without—on the surface of the painting. An unfolding evolutionary process through densely layered organic compositions made over time with layers upon layers of thick and thin washes and glazes, luminous and opaque. Often starting with calligraphic gestural marks, solid forms which then dissolve as the layers explode and implode, are added, rubbed out, re—applied, scoured into and scraped away. Going back and forth until another dimension—a sense of resonance— arises, when the whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts, where forms and marks become metaphors for a transcendent reality.”-Yari Ostovany

Missa in Augustiis VII (Mass for Troubled Times VII), 2016, Oil on canvas, 45 x 50 in.

Missa in Augustiis VII (Mass for Troubled Times VII), 2016, Oil on canvas, 45 x 50 in.

Peregrine No. 9,, 2016, Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

Peregrine No. 9,, 2016, Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 in.

Oracle III, 2016, Oil on canvas, 70 x 54 in.

Oracle III, 2016, Oil on canvas, 70 x 54 in.

Robert Stivers | Mystery of Darkness by Tasha Ostrander & Ben Lincoln

Portrait of Victoria, 2016 Gelatin Silver Print, 20 x 16 in.

Portrait of Victoria, 2016 Gelatin Silver Print, 20 x 16 in.

VIEW ROBERT STIVERS with braveART on ARTSY

braveART is pleased to represent American fine-art photographer, Robert Stivers. Beginning this month, braveART will feature Stivers' one-of-a-kind, silver gelatin prints. In his darkroom, Stivers works by hand with these individual, unique and un-editioned prints manipulating light and chemistry.

Born, November 17, 1953, Stivers is best known for his captivating imagery and darkroom technique. The New Yorker describes his work as ghostly black and white images whose theatricality smartly compliments their mystery. Robert has exhibited extensively, including solo shows in Los Angeles, New York City, Paris, Rome and Beijing. His work has been the subject of five monograms beginning with: Robert Stivers, Photography, 1997, Arena Editions. His most recent volume, The Art of Ruin, was published by Twin Palms Publishers in 2015. Robert’s work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Getty Museum, Harvard’s Fogg Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Bibliotheque Nationale, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, to name a few. Mr Stivers lives and works out of both Santa Fe, NM and Los Angeles, CA.

"[Helene] Greenberg-Wyman, (director at Messineo Art Projects/Wyman Contemporary, NY, NY) places Stivers among such well established and highly regarded photographers who have adopted a soft-focus approach as Adam Fuss and Bill Jacobson. 'Robert comes from the school of pictorials, as opposed to hyper realist, but, like Jacobson, he is more extreme and pushes the boundaries of style', Greenber-Wyman explains. Stivers agrees that his work is not so neatly defined - pictorials with a twist. 'Unlike pictorials, my work is much less idealized', he says. 'It's less about romanticizing and more about mystifying'. 

The mystification process of every Stivers' [work] is a timely and complicated one. Robert is like an alchemist, Greenberg-Wyman explains. He uses lens based photography and handles materials flipping things back and forth - sometimes overexposing, sometimes underexposing depending on what's going on with him. Then he might re-shoot a print he's already made and manipulate it further in the darkroom by enriching the tone of the gelatin silver print with more selenium or another kind of polytonal. That's how he performs, like in a lab.

Stivers' magic does not occur in a camera but in his hands in the darkroom - his images so manipulated that each one is a unique print. 'The cameras I use don't play an important part in my work", he says. "I've only ever had an old Hasselblad 500 CM and lighting equipment that I bought used when I first began. I'm not very savvy with computers. The manipulation and transformation of the negative or transparency to a print happens in the darkroom. For today I really like getting my hands dirty, the craftsmanship, and the hands-on feet of making something. Although, like everything I do, I'm sure that will shift'." (Rebecca Klein, Apogee Photo Magazine)

 

Bear, 1996 Gelatin Silver Print, 24 x 20 in.

Bear, 1996 Gelatin Silver Print, 24 x 20 in.

After Sargent, 2001 Gelatin Silver Print, 20 x 16 in.

After Sargent, 2001 Gelatin Silver Print, 20 x 16 in.

Rose, 2016 Gelatin Silver Print, 24 x 20 in.

Rose, 2016 Gelatin Silver Print, 24 x 20 in.

NATALIE BIESER | A Fresh Look at a Familiar World by Cara Montgomery by Tasha Ostrander

Dust Devil 2016, Watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 22 x 30 in.

Dust Devil 2016, Watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 22 x 30 in.

VIEW THE PORTFOLIOS AT NATALIEBIESR.COM

In advance of Natalie Bieser's upcoming pop-up exhibition, "Sierra Mountain Time", museum curator, author and essayist, Cara Montgomery, reviews Bieser's newest body of work:

"A Fresh Look at a Familiar World"

Natalie Bieser creates colorful and nuanced watercolor paintings that focus on the world of nature in it's beauty and complexity.

In her recent series "Square One: Grasses",  Bieser animates what is commonly viewed as dull grey weed matter into sparkling forms of colorful energy. The varied palette of the series illustrates how diverse tones can  impact the subject matter - a beautiful selection of red shades in "Ruby", a range of yellows, violets, chartreuse in "Dead Grass" and "Day Break on Grasses" then a stunning mix of rose, terra cotta, blue, violet, yellow and greens  in "Disturbance" and "Storm Tracks". This long neglected subject matter contains a world of life and energy, requiring a fresh and careful eye to regard an underplayed part of the environment. The Square One watercolors hold not only biologic and geographic markers, but inspiration for abstracting their essence in joyful illustrations of their primacy and energy. This art has transformed a subject otherwise little noticed by viewers into a whole new world of possible significance - paralleling their true importance as grounding matter in the everyday world we know. This portrayal offers an imaginative fresh look at the ordinary; hidden within may be the extrordinary. Bieser's comments on this series, on her website, nataliebieser.com, emphasize their function in connecting and firming everyday ground. Color and expressive shape give the theme new life and we, the viewer, think of grasses in a fresh way.  - Cara Montgomery

Cara Montgomery is an art historian and former curator of exhibitions at The Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL and The Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, FL.  She is the author of "Looking at Flowers", a survey of botanical illustration and flower paintings from 1600 to present.

Please join braveART and Natalie Bieser for the PUBLIC RECEPTION of her show, "Sierra Mountain Time" on December 9, 2016!

PUBLIC RECEPTION
Friday | December 9 | 5-7pm
at Natalie Bieser Studio
(map)
1225 Parkway Drive | Santa Fe | NM
-Off Siler Road and Rufina across from DUEL BREWING-

Extended Hours
Saturday & Sunday | December 10 & 11 | 12-5pm

Natalie Bieser | Santa Fe, NM | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2016

Natalie Bieser | Santa Fe, NM | Photo by Tasha Ostrander©2016

MATEO GALVANO | Trace of Gesture by Tasha Ostrander

Fable 2012, Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 in

Fable 2012, Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 in

VIEW MATEO GALVANO PORTFOLIO with braveART on ARTSY

 

braveART welcomes nine new paintings from Mateo Galvano.

In 2011 from her memoir entitled, Woolgathering, Patti Smith describes a field she used to look at as a child, into the night darkness, imagining a group of ghostly figures whom came to glean the field of it’s cotton wool, "On clear, peculiar nights I sometimes saw movement in the grasses. At first I thought it to be the swipe of the white owl or the great pale wings of a luna moth spreading and folding like a medieval habit. But it came to me one night that they were people like none I had ever seen, in strange archaic caps and dress. I used to think I could see the white of their bonnets and, at times, a hand, in the act of grasping, illuminated by the moon and stars or the light of a passing car”. She observed, "The music of the woolgatherers performing their task. Bending, extending, shaking out the air. Gathering what needs to be gathered. The discarded. The Adored. Bits of human spirit that somehow got away. Caught up in an apron. Plucked by a gloved hand.

From all this the cloud is formed. And the sky resembles the human opera.”  (Woolgahtering©1992, 2011 Patti Smith, New Direction Books)

And so too Mateo Galvano paints with a sense of this gathering from memories of life and love, bringing to the present the act of applying layer upon layer of gesture, metaphorical recordings of ghostly past that become a landscape holding both the absence and the presence of memory and the human spirit.  

Galvano speaks of his own work:

In my work, Conditions of absence and embodiment are investigated through strategies of abstraction and a practice of striving to depict the invisible. I’m exploring the conditions of being by working with systems of marks, colors and forms. It’s a practice of uncovering and finding my way by remaining open to the situations of the studio, being open to an idea or train of thought. The resultant images are translations of a series of actions, concerns and discoveries.

The absent human form is observed and commemorated as an atmospheric trace of gesture, like a mark or a stain left by a ghost. Its experiences are reflected in the landscape and the weather, reflected in the circumstances of constant change. Engaging the sensuality of landscape as a mirror to the spiritual component of the human figure, I aim to describe elemental qualities of the ephemeral, transient nature of existence.

- Mateo Galvano 2016

 

Nectar 2012, Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 in

Nectar 2012, Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 72 in

Hermatage 2010, Acrylic on panel, 16 x 16 in

Hermatage 2010, Acrylic on panel, 16 x 16 in